Is It OK to Give Your Dog Carrots?

It’s become evident that animals need a balanced diet just as much as humans do. Pet owners are often left perusing food labels in confusion, unsure of what they should be feeding their animals for optimal nutrition. Do cats needs vegetables? What kind of nutrients do dogs need?

Many commercial foods now contain a variety of fruits and vegetables for both dogs and cats, which leads many owners to wonder if they should be giving their dog vegetables. If you’ve ever been snacking on carrot sticks while your dog looks on pitifully, you might wonder how safe they are for your dog.

Giving Your Dog Carrots

Carrots are actually safe for most dogs. They’re rich in a variety of vitamins and nutrients that are great for a dog’s eyesight and immune system. Vitamins A, C, D, and B12 are just a handful of what’s packed inside this little orange veggie. Dogs get most of the same benefits from these vitamins as humans do.

These vitamins do wonders for a dog’s eyesight as they help to strengthen a dog’s vision to ward off potential blindness or other problems in the future. Carrots won’t undo existing eyesight damage, and dogs who have any variety of eye issues should still be looked at by a veterinarian for proper treatment.

It isn’t just what’s inside the carrot that’s so good for dogs, either. You probably know that dogs need abrasion on their teeth to help eliminate tartar that leads to nasty plaque build-up. Carrots are the perfect texture and consistency to naturally clean their teeth without any of the chemicals or messes associated with commercialized dental chews.

Consider This Before Feeding Your Dogs Carrots

Carrots are healthy, but they’re actually loaded with natural sugars. Natural sugar can be a good thing, but too much of it is definitely bad. Dogs with diabetes shouldn’t be given carrots to avoid how much sugar is being put into their body.

Carrots can also be a choking hazard, especially for dogs who are prone to hastily chewing their food and swallowing most of it whole. If you decide to give your dog carrots, you shouldn’t give it to them whole. Chopped into smaller pieces is a much safer alternative and can help eliminate any choking hazards.

Safely Feeding Carrots to Dogs

If you decide to feed your dog cooked carrots, you should avoid adding any seasonings. Onions and garlic may sound tasty to you, but these are both toxic to dogs. You should avoid the use of garlic and onion salts/powders, too, as they’re still dangerous to your dog’s health. If for some reason you decide to add baby food carrots to your dog’s diet, check the label to see if there’s any added seasonings or ingredients that could be trouble.

Remember that dogs are natural carnivores, so their bodies can’t digest vegetables as well as humans can. It’s normal to see undigested carrots in their bowel movements because they aren’t able to digest every bit of vegetables they’re given.

Carrots Are A Healthy Substitute Snack For Dogs

Is your dog a little overweight? Has your vet been telling you to slowly decrease your dog’s treats? You might be one of those many owners who can’t bear the sad eyes when your pup doesn’t get his treat. Some vets and nutritionists recommend replacing the Pupperonis with carrots or other chopped vegetables. A few dogs will look at you like you’re crazy, while others will go nuts for them. You can also cook the carrots and add them to their meals for extra fiber. Fiber is what keeps your dog feeling full for longer and helps curb how many times you’re given the puppy eyes. Fiber will help make a transition into a low-calorie diet much easier.

You can also cook the carrots and add them to their meals for extra fiber. Fiber is what keeps your dog feeling full for longer and helps curb how many times you’re given the puppy eyes. Fiber will help make a transition into a low-calorie diet much easier.

Before you start adding new items to your dog’s diet, you should always talk to their veterinarian. While carrots are generally safe for dogs, there are some dogs you should take special precautions with. Your vet will be the best judge of whether you can introduce these orange treats to your four-legged friend.